turtles

Would you eat that?

Imagine you are a hungry sea turtle that cannot tell the difference between a real jellyfish — a nutritious treat — and a floating plastic bag that very much resembles a jellyfish. Fooled by the illusion, you swallow the plastic bag — a deadly mistake. The plastic makes you feel so full that you unwittingly starve yourself to death!medasset poster

The plastic in our seas is killing hundreds of thousands of sea turtles and other marine animals each year, as they often mistake it for food. To raise awareness about this startling statistic, MEDASSET, an organisation that has been promoting safe and responsible waste disposal throughout the Mediterranean since 1998, created the “You See the Difference. A Turtle Does Not” campaign in 2012.

Millions of tourists visit the Mediterranean each summer, causing real problems for coastal communities, which are asked to manage waste well beyond their capacities. In response, MEDASSET, with support from various sponsors, placed giant posters at the Athens and Berlin Airports, hoping to directly target travelers about this enormous environmental issue.

Over the last two years, the response to the poster has been phenomenal. It has been placed in permanent exhibitions at prestigious museums and aquariums and gone viral on Facebook.

At the Vienna Natural History Museum

At the Vienna Natural History Museum

The best part of the campaign, however, is that it is truly international: it has been translated into twelve languages and adopted by like-minded organisations everywhere from Alaska, to island nations in the Indian ocean, to Costa Rica, to Australia, and all over the Mediterranean, MEDASSET’s field of activity.

It’s a tool that works, and we are glad we can share it and raise awareness about this global issue.

Jenny Ioannou, Head of Communications, MEDASSET
jennyioannou@medasset.org
www.medasset.org

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Beach clean in Cape Verde

Sal beach clean

To celebrate World Turtle Day, Isabel Kearney, Travel Foundation’s Destinations Programme Officer for Cape Verde took part in a beach clean on 25th May in Sal. The beach clean, which was organised by SOS Turtles, saw local residents and the SOS Turtles team come together on Kite Beach to collect litter. Isabel said:

“Despite being the most popular of Sal’s beaches for kite surfers, I was surprised by how much rubbish we collected – we filled twelve large bags in an hour with plastic jerry cans, bits of fishing nets and broken glass bottles.”

Isabel is in Sal for two weeks working with National Programme Manager Débora Abu-Raya visiting the Travel Foundation’s projects and attending the Destination Council.

For more information on the Travel Foundation’s work in Cape Verde, please visit our project pages and if you are in the travel industry, sign up for a beach clean as part of this July’s Make Holidays Cleaner campaign.

 

New turtle protection tool launched on World Turtle Day

Turtle in sea_1_hires

Today is World Turtle Day! And to celebrate we’ve launched a brand new turtle protection tool, designed to help hotels, tour operators, excursion providers and other tourism businesses become more “turtle friendly”.

Based on findings from a pilot scheme with four Karisma hotels in Mexico, the free online tool is packed with information and resources about beach management, excursion planning, staff training and customer communications.

The tool was developed in partnership with the Marine Conservation Society (MCS). Dr Peter Richardson, Biodiversity Programme Manager at MCS, said, “This valuable web resource should help make UK tourism far more friendly to threatened turtle populations around the world.”

Visit the new turtle protection tool